Jump to content

Close
Photo
- - - - -

Brushes etc


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 norson

norson

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 594 posts

Posted 21 October 2015 - 08:52 AM

I've now been using throw-away (cheap) brushes for applying gloss polyurethane to the canes for several good reasons. a) spray gets on everything in the vicinity B) I like the look of hand applied poly vs sprayed - for I can control the depth, etc.

 

But here's the issue with brushes vs spray - what to do with those brushes between coats - sometimes 24 hours apart. I'd like to use each brush for the completion of the project, then dispose of it but keeping them soft and supple has been difficult.

 

For a bit I was swiping the excess polyurethane away and then dipping it into paint thinner and leaving it to dry. Most recently I've been wiping away the excess and then sealing the brush inside a ziplock bag.

 

But I'm still searching out the best way to keep used brushes between coats.

 

Any suggestions, guys?

 

Thanx

-neb


  • CAS14 likes this

#2 Rodnogdog

Rodnogdog

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 343 posts
  • LocationNorth Carolina

Posted 21 October 2015 - 09:52 AM

Clean them well with mineral spirits. Have you tried applying poly with a balled up rag, making a pad as in French polishing, and wiping the poly on? I find that method works very well and provides a smoother finish than a brush and you can just throw the pad away.
  • norson likes this

#3 MJC4

MJC4

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,812 posts
  • LocationNW Indiana

Posted 21 October 2015 - 02:41 PM

I wrap brushes that are to be used again soon tightly in aluminum foil. Seems to work. Personally I don't like using cheap disposable brushes with poly as in my experience the bristles pull out and end up in the finish. I prefer a sponge brush or as Gordon does I'll use a rag


  • norson likes this

#4 norson

norson

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 594 posts

Posted 21 October 2015 - 03:44 PM

I'm not wild about getting polyurethane on my hands - therefore a brush works best for me.

Thanx

-neb



#5 cobalt

cobalt

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,930 posts
  • LocationBoston. England

Posted 21 October 2015 - 06:55 PM

polyurethane where water or spirit based is quickly cleaned but I wouldn't use cheap brushes like mark said the bristle fall out. but I only use it to coat toppers so I do use a brush to get into all the nooks and crannies, bit it is better to use thin coats and build it up..

think you would be better off using Danish oil with a rag on the shank.


  • norson likes this

#6 Rodnogdog

Rodnogdog

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 343 posts
  • LocationNorth Carolina

Posted 21 October 2015 - 08:31 PM

I'm not wild about getting polyurethane on my hands - therefore a brush works best for me.
Thanx
-neb

I've got a box of nitrile gloves (like they use in the doctors office) in my paint cabinet that I use for this purpose - no fuss, no muss, hands stay clean, clove gets tossed with the rag. You can buy them at Home Depot or the drug store.

Edited by Rodnogdog, 21 October 2015 - 08:33 PM.

  • norson likes this

#7 CAS14

CAS14

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,002 posts
  • LocationTulsa, OK

Posted 24 October 2015 - 04:01 AM

I'm not wild about getting polyurethane on my hands - therefore a brush works best for me.
Thanx
-neb

I've got a box of nitrile gloves (like they use in the doctors office) in my paint cabinet that I use for this purpose - no fuss, no muss, hands stay clean, clove gets tossed with the rag. You can buy them at Home Depot or the drug store.

Just don't put those on and say "bend over" or I'm running! ;-)
  • norson likes this

#8 CAS14

CAS14

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,002 posts
  • LocationTulsa, OK

Posted 24 October 2015 - 04:02 AM

Actually I use those nitrile gloves too when messing with anything that contains solvents.

#9 Whiteroselad

Whiteroselad

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 205 posts
  • LocationSouth Yorkshire, Great Britain.

Posted 17 December 2015 - 05:47 PM

Hi norson, I use a cut-down brush and leave it in the can so that all the bristles are always covered. With a new tin of finish I take some out and put it in an old jar, as I use up the finish I refill the tin as needed. To stop me getting finish all over my fingers I either use nitrile/rubber gloves or an old pair of pliers or mole grips (vice grips in USA I think) It works for me. It was a tip I saw an American fella called Jimmy Diresta use on a You Tube video. N.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users