Jump to content

Close
Photo
- - - - -

Pacific Northwest Wood Types


  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#21 Rodney

Rodney

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,106 posts
  • LocationCentralia, Washington

Posted 07 March 2016 - 05:40 PM

If I suspect I might be going to or even just through an area that might have sticks I make sure my stick collecting tools are in the car with me.

Alder isn't a bad wood.  If you look for logging roads that are a few years old there are often a lot of seedlings growing on or by them.

Alder tends to be one of the first trees to start growing on disturbed soil.

 

I really need to get out and find more sticks.

Rodney



#22 conmcb25

conmcb25

    Newbie

  • Registered
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • LocationPacific Northwest

Posted 07 March 2016 - 08:14 PM

/agreed

 

Red Alder grows like weeds out here :)

 

My 21 yr old was home on spring break, and when he is home we are in the woods, hiking, looking for rocks, enjoying the outdoors. Both of the specimens I found were up in the Cascades, along the I-90 corridor. Red Alder is all over along the forest roads. Heck its all over in the suburban area of Seattle in which I live :)

 

We are going to go beachcombing Thursday along the Pacific, north of Kalaloch. Ill see if I can find any likely spruce or cedar then.



#23 Crook

Crook

    Newbie

  • Registered
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • LocationWashington State

Posted 15 August 2016 - 06:48 AM

Here in WA yellow cedar grows at higher elevations, say 3000 ft+ from what I've seen.  Most of what you're likely to find in lower elevations will be western red cedar.   You said Seattle area.  Check out the Alpine Lakes Wilderness east of Seattle when the snow melts.  You should be able to find some there.

Rodney

Any idea about where Pacific Yew would be found?



#24 Rodney

Rodney

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,106 posts
  • LocationCentralia, Washington

Posted 15 August 2016 - 04:50 PM

Where are you located? 

Pacific Yew generally grows in ones and twos, more as an understory type tree under old growth.  They're slow growing.  They take a long time to get any size to them at all.  Look for something that looks sort of like a scrubby looking cedar.  The bark tends to be more scaly than red cedar and it has fine needles. 

There's actually a few of them growing right here in Centralia.

Rodney



#25 Crook

Crook

    Newbie

  • Registered
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • LocationWashington State

Posted 15 August 2016 - 11:25 PM

Where are you located? 

Pacific Yew generally grows in ones and twos, more as an understory type tree under old growth.  They're slow growing.  They take a long time to get any size to them at all.  Look for something that looks sort of like a scrubby looking cedar.  The bark tends to be more scaly than red cedar and it has fine needles. 

There's actually a few of them growing right here in Centralia.

Rodney

 

 

King County area, and yeah from the pictures I've seen I'd be hard pressed to spot them out among regular western red shrubby cedars.



#26 Rodney

Rodney

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,106 posts
  • LocationCentralia, Washington

Posted 16 August 2016 - 03:01 AM

It's been over 15 years since I lived up that way.  I can't give you any specific locations where I know for sure there would be trees.  Your best bet somewhat close to you would be somewhere like Snoqualmie Pass or even Stevens Pass or Forest Service land on the west side of the Cascades. 

I would concentrate on areas that still have some old growth timber.  Maybe make a day of it and have fun whether you find any yew or not.  Plenty of other species growing in the same areas that make good sticks too.

Rodney



#27 CAS14

CAS14

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,019 posts
  • LocationTulsa, OK

Posted 16 August 2016 - 03:11 AM

Eastern red cedar sapling from my brother's place in east Texas.

http://walkingstickf...l-metal-jacket/

#28 conmcb25

conmcb25

    Newbie

  • Registered
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • LocationPacific Northwest

Posted 16 August 2016 - 03:05 PM

Wikipedia wasn't a lot of help other than it said it likes to grow out here, and likes streams.



#29 Rodney

Rodney

    Advanced Member

  • Registered
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,106 posts
  • LocationCentralia, Washington

Posted 16 August 2016 - 05:09 PM

Yew is around but it's not terribly common.  Probably due to it's slow growth rates and logging.  Not a lot of mature old growth left these days.  It's pretty random when I see them.  One thing I forgot to mention is the trunks of the trees are almost always twisted and gnarly looking.

This will give you a good idea what to look for.

https://www.google.c...iw=1024&bih=639

Rodney



#30 Crook

Crook

    Newbie

  • Registered
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • LocationWashington State

Posted 16 August 2016 - 09:09 PM

Thanks Rodney, looks like I'll have to keep a sharp eye out.

 

As for sticks my area is overgrown with invasive hawthorn, holly, hazel and other things in the mean time.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users