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Direction of grain a limitation?


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#1 Lol999

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 03:52 PM

I have a piece of mahogany given to me by a friend which is about 3" square and 6" long. The grain runs in the short plane. What I would like to do is to carve a hiking stick handle with some sort of animal head at the top. Is the direction of the grain going to be a weakness in the handle?



#2 cobalt

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 11:41 PM

It sounds as though the grain would be better running the other way .but if your careful you should be able to get a good animal topper from ..It depends on what you want to carve .There is always a weakness in the way the grain runs .

Its a case of keeping your chisels sharp and not trying to take to material of at once slow and steady like most carvings is the best approach .It often works to your advantage .

Make sure you wear a mask if using powers tools the dust isn't good for you.



#3 Lol999

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 08:33 AM

Hi Cobalt it would only be something simple, I rather like the idea of a fish head morphing out of the top or with it being quite a rusty red colour I thought a simple squirrel might do the trick. I was just concerned with strength of the handle itself, although it will be a good 1.5" in diameter at least so it should be pretty strong.



#4 CV3

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 03:07 PM

 I agree with cobalt it would be best for a topper. A handle would be very vulnerable to braking. You may be able to drill a 1/4 or 3/8 hole in the center of the top inch,then insert and glue in a  threaded rod. stop it braking with the cross grain of the handle. Here 's a  rough sketch. 

 

 

 

IMG_3715 (2).JPG


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#5 Rodney

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 04:03 PM

 I agree with cobalt it would be best for a topper. A handle would be very vulnerable to braking. You may be able to drill a 1/4 or 3/8 hole in the center of the top inch,then insert and glue in a  threaded rod. stop it braking with the cross grain of the handle. Here 's a  rough sketch. 

 

 

 

attachicon.gifIMG_3715 (2).JPG

This.

Rodney



#6 JJireh

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 05:28 PM

You can also do at thin insert or sandwich with another stronger material to prevent grain issues.



#7 cobalt

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 07:52 PM

JJireh is good suggestion it would it would make the handle more attractive

providing a nice contrast t the handle

also cv3 idea works if you use a end cap to cover the hole you inserted it with

I have inserted a hardwood dowel into a cardigan handle made from lime w the covered it up with a buffalo horn end cap using cv3 principle

this is a handle made with a hardwood dowel inserted then covered with a buffalo horn end cap

CARDIGAN STICKS (12).JPG

 


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#8 Lol999

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 09:07 PM

This would actually be a fully vertical handle, finger grooves at the lower half and an animal popping out of the top. I guess a long length of threaded rod could be put in from the bottom and no-one would know.



#9 Gloops

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 06:37 AM

Hi Lol999

Agree with all suggestions. My basic block size for dog, bird  toppers is 90x60x110 mm and I prefer the grain to run along the 90mm

plane. My reasoning behind this is that it gives cross grain strength along the nose beak area, the neck area down to the shaft is strengthened by inserting the 8mm dia threaded mounting bar deep enough to pass the throat area and into the head, and never had a prob.

 

IMG_3678.jpg

 

Very early on I started by having the grain down towards the shank and had a "broken nose", reattached it by pinning and glueing, I then pre-empted this by inserting alength of 1/16" dia piano wire into the head

through the nose/beak past the tip to head transition point - too much work so went the way as above


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