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#1 Rodney

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 01:33 AM

I mentioned in the "Good Morning" thread that I roughed out a couple Cardigan handles.  Well, not quite. 

They're still good handles, they just aren't good Cardigan handles.  I made a really basic mistake.  Instead of going for one or two really good handles from the block I was cutting them from I got greedy and tried to get more.

handles%20001_zpsptdaqpdu.jpg

The two blanks in question are on the left.  They're some pretty nice curly maple. That's why I was trying to maximize the yield.  The problem is there's not enough wood at the butt end of the handles to get that long end that is a definitive feature of a good Cardigan handle.  I'll still get a couple nice handles from them but looking back I think one truly good handle would have been better.

There's another mistake in this picture.  The Market stick handle on the top right is perfectly fine at this point.  The handle on the bottom right isn't.  Instead of staying with the perfectly good market stick handle that it was shaping up to be I decided to get creative.  It looks ok but there's one basic problem.  It's not that comfortable to hold.  Staying with the traditional market stick shape would have been far better.  I may end up scrapping it.  Uncomfortable canes don't get used.

 

Here's another couple mistakes.

handles%20002_zps54uhypkl.jpg

The pistol grip handle at the top is from a piece of Pacific Madrone I had that had an interesting branch growing out at a funny angle.  The branch is now the shank on this handle.  The problem with this one is a little less apparent.  The piece was originally big enough to get a Cardigan handle from until I mis-cut one angle on the bandsaw.  The pistol grip is what I could salvage from that error.  It will still be a decent handle, just not as good as it could have been.

 

The derby/fritz style handle at the bottom has a chip out on the edge where it joins the shank due to an unsupported cut at the table saw. I cut the angle after the handle was already mostly shaped.  It would have been far better to cut that angle while the handle still had some good square surfaces to use to guide the cut.  Not a huge issue.  There's enough material that it will go away when I fit the handle to the shank.

The third handle is roughed out from an oak branch that had a nice curve at what is now the top of the handle.  No real mistakes on this one.  I just need to mate it with an appropriate shank.  I'll finish the shaping then.

 

 

Here's another shot of the derby handle, this time on the shank.

handles%20004_zpsgbxl9kr6.jpg

The small gap between the handle and shank is another direct result of making the angled cut after the handle was shaped.  I'll end up drilling the hole bigger and filling the gap between the wood and all-thread with epoxy to straighten it out.  It won't affect the strength of the cane but is extra work that could have been avoided with better planning. 

handles%20005_zpsrl9e24xl.jpg

This cane will be a gift to a friend of a friend when it's complete.  The handle and bottom of the shank are cherry, there's a section of curly maple in the middle with a couple spacers of raintree wood to separate them.

 

This last shot is a couple of Cardigan style canes I'm finishing.  You can see the long butt on these ones that the handles in the first picture lack.

handles%20006_zps0pahevlt.jpg

They're hanging upside down while I oil them.  I'm just a couple coats away from them being done now.

Thanks for looking,

Rodney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#2 RandyL476

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 01:57 AM

Great job you've done, love the grain in the handles.

#3 Gloops

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 09:42 AM

Nice looking sticks Rodney,making mistakes are the quickest way to speed up the learning process, you tend not to remake them on other projects. We have all been there.



#4 cobalt

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 10:14 AM

A lot of work and care there Rodney it can only be applauded well done

Like the collars just adds something to the stick some nice wood

I consider a market stick to be about armpit height so the market stick isn't for gripping .You see some guys resting there hands on the top of the stick then resting there chins on it .Although some use it as a walking stick

its annoying when you make a mistake but we have all done it very nice work keep it up .I also have tried to get as much material out of a plank of wood sometimes detrimental for our aims and causes of a lot of annoyance



#5 norson

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 11:05 AM

I really like the contrasting colors.

GREAT job.



#6 dww2

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 01:35 PM

LOVE the pistol grip madrone handle from the second picture. The U shaped bark inclusion and the grain surrounding it, I am sure, will look fantastic when finished.

Those 45 degree joints on the sticks in the other pictures must be insanely difficult to get so perfect. Really gorgeous work!



#7 Rodney

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 02:31 PM

The trick to the 45* cuts is drill the holes in the blanks first while everything is still square, then cut your angles.  That way the bit doesn't wander.  I have my ShopSmith set up as a horizontal borer for drilling the shanks.  I really should build a special table for it for that operation to make holding the blanks square to the bit easier.

Rodney


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#8 JJireh

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 03:58 PM

Those all look great, happy mistakes or not.  Congrats on keeping forward motion!



#9 Rodney

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 07:10 PM

They weren't happy mistakes.   Mostly I posted them in the hopes that I might save someone else the aggravation of making the same mistakes themselves.  While I'll be able to save them it's still the difference between good and better in most of the cases.

 

Cobalt I might go ahead and put a long traditional shank on that experimental market stick topper.  That way I'm at least not wasting it.

 

I like the madrone handle too.  It's actually more comfortable to hold than I expected too. There's some good red around the bark inclusion and it will have some pretty grain.  I'll most likely fill the inclusion with some clear epoxy.  It won't affect the strength of the stick but it's not going to finish smooth as-is either.  I'm also going to steam it and see if I can get the shank just a little straighter.  If not I'll have to trim it a little shorter than I would like.

Rodney


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#10 cobalt

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Posted 13 February 2017 - 08:48 PM

I shouldnt worry to much about mistakes they seem to coming along fine to me and i think they may turn out better than you think

steaming the shank to straigthen it is better than using the hot air gun theres no chance of scotching it ,good luck with it keep posting the pics






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