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Rocky Top


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#11 Rodney

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 08:07 PM

Good luck with the drilling.  Do you use any coolant when you drill?

Will a file touch the stone?  You may be able to speed up the shaping and smoothing a bit if  one will work.

When I was working with that piece of jade I found I could shape it with a file.  The stone pretty well ruined a new sanding disk when I tried that.

Should be a pretty topper when you're done.

Rodney



#12 CAS14

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 08:27 PM

Good luck with the drilling.  Do you use any coolant when you drill?
Will a file touch the stone?  You may be able to speed up the shaping and smoothing a bit if  one will work.
When I was working with that piece of jade I found I could shape it with a file.  The stone pretty well ruined a new sanding disk when I tried that.
Should be a pretty topper when you're done.
Rodney


I'm afraid to use a masonry bit due to the vibration, and I'm not set up for coolant on the drill press. In addition, I'm afraid to apply too much pressure due to the risk of splitting the core. Very slow going! Beginning with a very small bit.

#13 CAS14

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 12:05 AM

The small metal bit wasn't cutting it, and is ruined after penetrating less than 1/8".  I've bought a cheap 3/8" tile bit, and I'll squirt water on it periodically.  Maybe this will work, maybe not.



#14 MJC4

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 12:50 AM

Interesting project CAS, The rock hound across the street uses diamond bits to drill his polished rock projects.



#15 CAS14

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 02:12 AM

The cheap tile bit wore out about 1/8" too soon. My goal was to leave just a couple of threads as an anchor for the overlying JB Weld or epoxy.

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I have two options, cut off 1/8" and the threads, or buy another tile bit and risk fracturing the core. I'll sleep on it, but I'll probably take the risk and buy another bit.

#16 dww2

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 10:19 AM

Maybe try drilling it while it sits in a dish of water. I've seen a few you tube vids on doing it this way and they seem to have good luck.



#17 Rodney

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 01:45 PM

Score the smooth part of the bolt with a file or hacksaw or grinder so the epoxy has something to grab.  No risk to the stone that way.

Rodney


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#18 Gloops

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 09:21 AM

Good luck with it, keep us posted.



#19 CAS14

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 03:12 AM

Score the smooth part of the bolt with a file or hacksaw or grinder so the epoxy has something to grab.  No risk to the stone that way.
Rodney


Rodney, great suggestion! I did that and scored the shank with a file. I just used JB Weld to secure the cut-off hanger bolt, and now I'm thinking about how best to perfectly align this with the threaded insert in the stick.

#20 CAS14

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 03:21 AM

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The next challenge is to perfectly align the shank with future threads in the wood shank. IMG_4618.JPG IMG_4619.JPG IMG_4621.JPG




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