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shillelagh


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#1 fenland

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 03:41 PM

I have this nice piece to turn into a shillelagh when it is seasoned. Should I take the bark off now or wait. Plus what is the best way to remove the bark?20170314_172058-1.jpg



#2 LilysDad

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 05:56 PM

All the She . . . yeah, that, I have ever seen had the bark on. It was sanded smooth and oiled.


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#3 cobalt

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 11:31 PM

I would just leave it to season before I did anything bit of a twisted top offers lots of choices


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#4 CV3

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 12:38 PM

I agree with leaving the bark on for seasoning. On a small stick I use a rorbater sander with 80 grit paper to clean of the bark.most of the time. 


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#5 Rodney

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 04:22 PM

Another leave the bark on for seasoning.  If wood  dries too fast you can get splitting at the ends. The bark helps slow it down.

The general rule of thumb is let it cure a year per inch of thickness. Sometimes you can get by with less.  Depends on the stick. 

Put it in a cool dry place and forget about it for a while.

 

I usually just use a pocket knife or utility knife to peel the bark when I don't want to keep it on.

Rodney


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