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Coppicing


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#1 CV3

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 02:02 PM

I have always been impressed with the great supplies of shanks of many different woods in the UK. Many go out and cut thier own. But I learned that In the UK many manage growth in the woods doing what they call coppicing, a term I had not heard untile yesterday. It is the cutting back of different wood growths so the will grow back .They use the cuttings for many things but it also makes for a great resorce for walking sticks. Thought some of you would also fined this interesting.

 

 www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkRuMqVuJDE


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#2 Rodney

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 03:45 PM

I think that given the abundance of mature forests here when European settlers first arrived that coppicing never became common here in the states.

Too many other resources available so there was no need. Building habits changed to fit what was available.

It is something to consider if you're a stickmaker with a bit of land though.

Rodney


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#3 LilysDad

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 09:04 PM

At one time, farmers in the Mid-West American states planted hedge rows of Osage-orange, a tough and thorny tree. They would prune them to the extent that the plants would remain multi-branched and dense, thereby keeping animals enclosed. Now, barbed wire and other modern fencing have caused the hedges to be ignored and removed. Pity! Osage-orange is a wonderful plant. Hard, tough, and colorful wood.


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#4 cobalt

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 12:12 AM

that's not good as hedgerows encourage a diverse  range of wild life

Farmers here are encouraged to replant hedge rows and some grants are available to do so. not only encourages wild life but it also offes some protection for crops as wind breaks etc.

coppicing is still common here it keeps plants and hedge rows healty and provides plenty of sticks  and a useful source for hurdle makers (hurdles is a type of fence made from weaving hazel willow etc) still practised by people 


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#5 CV3

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 06:03 AM

It would be nice if they did that here. There are many trees in our area but not the hedgerow type growth avalible to you in the UK. .



#6 walkingthedog

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 01:05 PM

A very useful and productive way of having wood year after year.

#7 cobalt

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 06:22 PM

when i cut the shanks for storage there far to long so when i trim them i stick the tops of the stick back into the ground as they will take root , it just ensures a young supply os shanks 


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#8 Gloops

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 07:20 AM

I have revisited where I have cut in previous years and looked at the where I made the cuts and in all cases between 2 and 4 new shoots are growing from the short stump left after cutting thus my cutting is promoting new growth and sustaining the mother stock.



#9 dww2

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 07:33 PM

Closest thing you will find here in the US is an area which has been logged and the tree stumps have sprouts coming up from them.

 

There is a woodlot behind where I live that my late brother and a friend logged a few years ago. I should go check it out soon.



#10 cobalt

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 01:39 PM

Hampshire coppicing group

http://www.hampshirecoppice.co.uk/






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