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Durability Chart


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#1 LilysDad

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 06:53 PM

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Edited by LilysDad, 25 January 2018 - 06:59 PM.

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#2 LilysDad

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 07:01 PM

I'm sorry. When I tried to copy this from a file, it was unreadable. I had to copy and paste it.



#3 Rodney

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 02:12 PM

Thanks.  Good information.  A lot depends on the conditions the wood is in but it's a good general guide.



#4 CAS14

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 07:44 PM

I'm pleasantly surprise at how well the cedar ranks.  It's a fairly soft wood, but apparently reasonably resistant to weathering.  I'm able to nab some on occasion when I visit my brother or he visits me.

 

Thanks for the post!



#5 MJC4

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 10:57 PM

I'm pleasantly surprise at how well the cedar ranks.  It's a fairly soft wood, but apparently reasonably resistant to weathering.  I'm able to nab some on occasion when I visit my brother or he visits me.

 

Thanks for the post!

CAS white cedar, the native cedar around here, is used extensively for outdoor furniture and fence posts around the upper Midwest. We have a back yard swing that is 20 plus years old made from it. Good stuff but hard to find in the woods for stick making material as most is small and gnarly.  


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#6 yaxley

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Posted 21 February 2018 - 07:09 AM

Not sure what is meant by "durable?" Unfinished wood exposed to what environment? The environment in coastal areas is a lot different than the desert. Type of finish is a variable.

 

Not trying to be difficult, just trying to understand. Can someone amplify the questions?



#7 Rodney

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 04:43 PM

Conditions do play a part and even then there are going to be exceptions but the chart is good for getting a general idea of the relative durability of the various species.  There are also variables like heartwood vs. sapwood within the same species.  By the time you charted all the species factoring in all the variables it would no longer be a chart but more like an encyclopedia.

 

Western red cedar used to be the preferred wood for fence posts and outdoor use here.  The old growth cedar had great rot resistance.  The little second and third growth stuff they harvest now isn't nearly as good.  Same with Douglas fir.  Old growth and second growth might as well be two separate species as far as how the wood looks and behaves. 


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#8 Mike-Maine

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 06:16 PM

I'm pleasantly surprise at how well the cedar ranks. It's a fairly soft wood, but apparently reasonably resistant to weathering. I'm able to nab some on occasion when I visit my brother or he visits me.

Thanks for the post!



#9 Mike-Maine

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 06:26 PM

I'm not surpised at it's durability but,the load bearing weight is what concerns me.

As I understand it there is a church in Boston who's foundation used cedar. The city was originally built on a wetland that was filled in. Since, cedar is resistant to rot if kept wet it was the perfect selection.

#10 cobalt

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 12:21 AM

The wood mainly used is oak . yes it is built on wetland and probably the finest calendar church in England . It was built on money made from wool and woad 

its 700years old  but Blackfriars is older and mayby the guild  hall is older along with a few more buildings 

As for using cedar most wood used for stickmaking here is hazel,  ash , blackthorn , chestnut, birch, hawthorn, holly, mountain ash, 


Edited by cobalt, 03 April 2018 - 12:28 AM.





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