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My First Haul


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#1 KenVA

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 04:38 PM

Went out collecting this weekend on my property. Unfortunately, we're 16 inches above normal rain this year so anything already down is mostly rotted. These were cut from saplings. Not a bad haul for about 2 hrs and never going more than 100 yards from the house!

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Edited by KenVA, 12 November 2018 - 04:39 PM.

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#2 Rohn

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 05:25 PM

Those will make some nice walking sticks!



#3 Rodney

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 05:34 PM

Looks like you had a good day.  Try digging a few up too.  There's a chance you can get some good root sticks too.



#4 KenVA

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 06:16 PM

I'm not exactly sure what they are. I know some are hickory and some may be birch. The ones on the right are dense and very heavy.



#5 dww2

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Posted 14 November 2018 - 09:26 AM

Nice haul. I'd say hickory was a distinct possibility for a lot of them. Don't see any which appear birch, though. I would be willing to bet that at least the one second from right was hornbeam. It has the typical rippled, muscular-looking bark and you say its very heavy.

#6 KenVA

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 08:51 PM

dww2, 

 

It's hard to see from the picture but all 3 pieces on the right have that same texture. In fact, I think the two far right ones came from the same sapling. All three are very dense and heavy.


Edited by KenVA, 15 November 2018 - 08:52 PM.


#7 dww2

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 09:10 AM

After expanding the picture a bit, I can see the same feature, though not as pronounced. That's a problem I've run into a few times; cutting a stick and not being 100% sure what the wood is. (Or knowing what it is when I cut it then not being able to remember what it is when it has dried.) I now usually take a sharpie marker with me and mark the cut ends. A for ash. M for maple. etc. Like Rodney mentioned, you should try digging one to see if you can get a nice root handle. I like to probe around the base with the blade of my saw and see what it has for roots.

#8 Rodney

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 04:57 PM

I mark mine with the species when I know it and the month and year it was picked.  That way I have a better idea of whether they're dry enough to use yet or not.

Figure a year per inch of thickness as a safe rule of thumb.  Lighter species generally dry faster than denser ones.



#9 KenVA

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Posted 17 November 2018 - 04:49 AM

I'm really new to this so identifying wood is tough, especially this time of year when most if not all of the leaves are gone. Some may be dense hardwoods and others not. I try to get an idea by tapping the back end of my machete on it to get a feel for the density. I do plan to sell them at craft fairs and such and I think knowing what wood it is would be helpful but I guess as long as it's a hardwood species that finishes nicely and will last, that's all that really matters. And also , because I will be selling them I hope to need new inventory every year. Here in Virginia you kind of have to collect in the late fall through winter if you can to avoid the ticks and chiggers. Between Alpha Gal (red meat allergy) and Lyme disease, you really want to avoid ticks here. I'll be going out again this weekend and Thanksgiving weekend since I'll be off for four days and the weather looks good. I hope to have 30-40 this season, add more next season then work on this seasons haul over the  late winter through summer of 2020. Can't really do anything but collect until this seasons haul is dry so I also plan on working on other craft items to sell during this coming summer.



#10 dww2

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 07:41 AM

Yeah we have the ticks and blackflies here, so I know what you mean.(Heard of a few cases of the meat allergy thing plus a lot of lyme disease.) Deerflies, horseflies and mooseflies, too. Number one item in my stick collecting kit is bug spray. I like to collect this time of year, but unfortunately, it's hunting season so I don't go near the woods. I tend to go in late Sept to Oct. A twig identifier can help some if you can't tell the species by the bark. https://www.thoughtc...gallery-4122781




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